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Raise High The Red, Black, and Green (and/or Gold)

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Fight The Power!! Join debunkingzra Jan. 11th, 2006 @ 12:28 pm
bombyamom
Are you tired of dumbass liberals/libertarians who are more obsessed with legalizing
marijuana and the size of black penises than actually LISTENING to people of color and
considering their experiences?

Is your patience for back-patting white progressives and their inability to face their own
privilege in any quantifiable fashion about run out?

Have you been quoted as being "a poor liberal" or "a racist" because you react negatively to the nearly universal racial ignorance of white people?

Are you bitter and angry from your busted-ass beard and whiney attitude preventing you from getting any since 10th grade?

Are you frustrated that people of color want nothing to do with you, and that you have
failed in your quest to physically fulfill your fetishization of the "other" (black men and
women)?

Wait. Not the last two.

Anyway, if you are, than I invite you to join. This community is for people who
are tired of babied white boys coming into their safe spaces and talking about Krunk Rap,
Chris Rock, or Kolbe Bryant. Even more so if you have been a victim of the repeated sobbing and violin-playing of zra, and any of his disguised Klansman that follow him around. We at debunkingzra offer our support to anyone who has had to repeat themselves for the 10th time, only to have the same ::headdesk:: response.

I encourage anyone from blackfolks, sex_and_race, debunkingwhite, or even just popularly trolled personal journals to join up and give us some love.

Remember: When the revolution starts, we need to have a hit list. Make sure
yours has zra placed right after Bill O'Riley, but before Vanilla Ice.

Peace. Love. Respect.
-bombyamom

Black-Native American Community Dec. 29th, 2005 @ 02:00 am
miyaunna
blindi

Ask yourself:

1. Have you ever wanted to connect with/learn about other Black-Native American peoples and your/their history?
2. Are you tired of having racism directed at you by Non-Native Americans/Native Americans who don't respect or care to understand your ancestry?
3. Do you know what the Binay Tribe is?
4. Are you disgusted and angered by the Blood Quantam rules when used to weed out Black-Native Americans?
5. Are you sick of trying to prove your heritage to people who choose to ignore American history?
Read more...Collapse )

Kwanzaa Dec. 12th, 2005 @ 11:47 am
beautifullymade
Kwanzaa is a seven day American holiday that was created by Professor Maulana Karenga in 1966 to help link black Americans to their African roots. According to the official Kwanzaa website, the word “kwanza” is derived from the Swahili phrase matunda ya kwanza” or “first fruits” and is modeled on the first fruits celebrations in ancient Africa, such as Umkhost of Zululand.

The website says that Kwanzaa was "created out of the philosophy of Kawaida, a cultural nationalist philosophy that arges that the key challenge in Black Americans' lives is the challenge of culture, and that what Africans must do is discover and bring forth the best of their culture, both ancient and current, and use it as a foundation to bring into being models of human excellence and possibilities to enrich and expand their lives." It is celebrated by the daily lighting of seven candles, each representing the Nguzo Saba or The Seven Principles: Umoja, Kujichaguilia, Ujima, Ujamaa, Nia, Kuumba and Imani.

Do you think this American holiday exploits African culture?

America's Friends, the French Racists Nov. 13th, 2005 @ 10:19 am
cynicgal
Now, as many of you know, I have my particular reasons to not be enamoured of France, or of Europe, generally. Someone recently asked me if I'd ever been, and seemed shocked that though I recognize I will eventually have to (since they took all of the good archival material from their colonies), I do not relish the prospect; to me, it is all one enormous graveyard. To paraphrase Eric Williams, there is not one beautiful building or monument on the continent that is not connected to the blood of an African.

That being said, recent events in France have given me a great deal of hope. As most of you know, property destruction, to me, is a legitimate form of protest. I don't hold personal property sacred, and for people who have been dispossessed of a possibility for material and social equity within la Republique, it seems like an even more cogent notion to torch the cars they will never be able to own. This uprising seems Pan-African in nature, which gives me even more hope. And it has spread across France, and even to Belgium, Germany, and the Netherlands.

Let's face it, people: the myth of successful integration is just that. In our own country, public schools are actually more segregated than they were before Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka (Don't believe me? Visit the Mumford Center of SUNY's website, http://mumford1.dyndns.org/cen2000/data.html). In France, former colonized people remain unwanted, shunned, and the target of the same sorts of policies of segregation and oppression they faced in the colonies. Don't believe me? Why is it that the law employed by the French government to quell the protests is the same one employed during the war in Algeria? It is no coincidence. There may be room for Senghor at the French table, but that's about it. And the table in the U.S. is a scarier one still, as it necessitates an even more thorough abandonment of one's soul (see Clarence Thomas).

I remain hopeful that this will bring about real change in Europe, but what seems to be happening is the same thing that happens here: white folks are circling the not-so-proverbial wagons. Read this:
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20051113/ap_on_re_eu/france_rioting_fr1.

And this is why I feel that it is imperative to use whatever means are at our disposal to generate a liberatory discourse. The turn-the-other-cheek-erosion-of-national-sovereignty-NGO-IMF-World Bank solution is clearly corrupt at its fore; I even saw a Time magazine lauding NGOs while waiting at the doctor's on Friday, which should evince how sick the whole enterprise is. It's colonialism on the cheap, again. Private corporations reap the benefits. "Charity" inadequately and, in most cases, destructively, fills in the gaps.

Oh, I could scream.

Jess

x-posted to my own journal

Several Newsfeeds of Interests Oct. 11th, 2005 @ 11:48 am
rayne_vandunem
aa_as_au_africa
aa_eu_africa
aa_kenya
aa_latam_africa
aa_latest
aa_me_africa
aa_nigeria
aa_panafrica
aa_southafrica
aa_usafrica
alterpresse
angryblackbitch
anti_coonshow
arealvoodooclub
bbc_news_africa
caribbeanfete
chavezhugito
dutchanthemz
egbeomo_na
metaids_fr
naijapolitics
omo_oduduwa
playahatadotcom
trueblackness
yoruba_lukumi
yorubaworld
Other entries
» Use of the ICC court against Rebels from Northern Uganda

October 8, 2005
The Independent (UK)

UGANDAN CHIEF OF LORD'S ARMY FACES WAR CRIMES TRIAL
By Meera Selva


The International Criminal Court (ICC) is facing a crucial test of its credibility after issuing its first arrest warrants, for five leaders of the Ugandan rebel group, the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA).
.....Collapse )

» This says it all
title or description

From http://chilesur.indymedia.org/es/2004/12/1068.shtml

Read more...Collapse )

Just today, Kevin was arrested by the PNH. http://www.newsocialist.org/index.php?id=464
» I think this is touching...
title or description

Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez (L) hugs a Haitian medical graduate (2nd L) overcome with emotion, as Cuban President Fidel Castro (R) speaks at Havana's Karl Marx theatre August 20, 2005. Castro and Chavez attended the first graduation of the Latin American School of Medicine, where 1,510 medical students from 16 Latin American countries graduated. REUTERS/Claudia Daut

From Haiti on Yahoo! News Photos

hugo_chavez

For some odd reason, this reminds me of those early morning shows on the Christian fundy networks which my Mom often watches. Brrr...! *shakes*
» Any know the name of this painting or artist??? x-posted to afro-eccentrix
A long time ago... maybe 7 years ago, I saw an add for a set of limited edition art prints in Ebony Magazine. They were really expensive at the time but I fell in love with the picture. The painting was very dark with one source of warm light. There was a pile of quilts high enough to be reminiscent of princess and the pea. On top of the quilts was a gorgeous women with long dreadlocks flowing behind her. I fell in the love with the painting but I can't remember the artists name now. I think the name of the painting may have been "The Quilt" but I'm not sure. Has anyone heard of or seen this painting or know the name of the artist? I am having no luck with google and any help would be huge, I want it as a present to myself for Xmas.
» About the Live 8 concert series
Sorry for the cynicism, but I find the Live 8 concert series to be slightly unrealistic in its motives.

I mean, the campaign to erase poverty in the Third World, especially Africa: I know that this series may put pressure on the G8 to write off the debt for the world's poorest nations, but I mean, come on! These countries are only going to rack up another string of debt in the next few decades, while many of them will also continue to sponsor domestic terrorism against their own people in order to keep themselves in power.

I mean, what will come out of this? Will this be the reason that the world's biggest lenders will offer in the coming decades for why Africa is still in poverty, or, worse, in debt to them again (in a "see, it wasn't my fault after Live 8" type of fashion)?

Furthermore, if the G8 is going to eradicate poverty in the Third World, then why couldn't they have done it before, say, President Aristide was overthrown in Haiti back last year? Haiti is, like most of sub-Saharan Africa, a predominately-"Black" country, in fact, the world's first Black republic. Aristide was trying his best to help the Haitian people through government programs; however, the money and resources which were needed to bring Haiti back from the point of starvation were nonexistent, thanks to the U.S.'s tendency to whip the rebellious stepchild's ass.

And even after Aristide, a purpoted "dictator" in the eyes of the Western media (which has never liked Haiti since 1804), was overthrown with overt U.S., Canadian, and French support, things have gone from bad to worse in that country. Thank you, G8!

As far as I'm concerned, the Live 8 concert series is only serving the paternalistic attitude of the West, and all of its efforts can burn in hell.

Oh, so you can help the hungry people of a far-away continent, but when they are at your doorstep, you can treat them like shit? No...fucking...way!

Again, sorry for the cynicism.
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